2013-06-25

ADATA NH92 recurring malfunction

3 comments:

Ryan Trilessky said...

I have got the same problem. Testdisk report that Boot sector is not OK, but the backup of Boot Sector is OK. I have restored the Boot Sector from backup, and booted. Now Windows can see the memory card that was affected, but I get only one file called USBC.
A file recovery program told me I have different FAT copies. But I wasn't sure if I want to use "experimental" option of FAT fix in Testdisk, because there is no option to backup the FATs first. What should I do? Or, how at least I can backup the FATs, so if the fix fails, I can restore to the previous state to try something else?

quetzalcoatl said...

Ryan: sorry for the delay. I was in a middle of a holiday trip when you posted, and I didn't notice it earlier. The easiest way to backup the contents is to create an image of the whole device. Note that I mean "device" not just "volume" (partition, etc). If you have any access to any linux, there's a `dd` command that will be able to literally copy everything byte-by-byte from raw device like /dev/sda to a file, or later copy it from the file to the device. It can take some time and it will create "backups" (or rather, dumps) with no compression, so be sure to have enough free space. Regarding USBC file - it means that the restore failed. Either a wrong backup was chosen, or the backup was damaged, too, or maybe everything went well and it's "just" the real partition that is damaged. Any of it could have happened if you tried repairing the drive with other tools before running TestDisk. You 'd best have taken a whole-device dump/backup even before running testdisk, just in case. Now as it is, the best thing (except for taking a backup, late but still), I'd check with hexeditor or any other raw drive analyzer to see what are the actual contents of the device. The "USBC" file is not a file. It is a header of a section. From my experience, seeing USBC as a file usually means that this section has been misplaced during repair, and it's usually +1 or -1 sector off from the place it should be. The section sometimes gets duplicated, too. However, in all such cases, the actual correct contents of the drive were still there, and after I reconstructed the contents of that sector, everything started working well. I think I described all I knew and done.. sorry, it's hard to remember now

Alex S. said...

"The BootSector that was damaged was at offset 0x7E00 so at sector 0x3E".

Here is error. Sector at offset 0x7E00 has LBA number 0x3F.